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NIGERIAN JUDICATURE



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RULES OF 36 STATE COURTS

RULES OF ALL FEDERAL COURT

JUDGMENTS OF FEDERAL COURTS

SUPREME COURT

COURTS OF APPEAL

FEDERAL HIGH COURT

NATIONAL INDUSTRIAL COURT

ELECTION TRIBUNALS

CODE OF CONDUCT TRIBUNAL

INV. & SECURITIES TRIBUNAL

MILITARY TRIBUNALS

INTERNATIONAL TRIBUNALS


STATE/FCT HIGH COURTS

ABIA STATE HIGH COURT

ABUJA/FCT HIGH COURT

ADAMAWA STATE HIGH COURT

AKWA IBOM STATE HIGH COURT

ANAMBRA STATE HIGH COURT

BAUCHI STATE HIGH COURT

BAYELSA STATE HIGH COURT

BENUE STATE HIGH COURT

BORNO STATE HIGH COURT

CROSS RIVER STATE HIGH COURT

DELTA STATE HIGH COURT

EBONYI STATE HIGH COURT

EDO STATE HIGH COURT

EKITI STATE HIGH COURT

ENUGU STATE HIGH COURT

GOMBE STATE HIGH COURT

IMO STATE HIGH COURT

JIGAWA STATE HIGH COURT

KADUNA STATE HIGH COURT

KANO STATE HIGH COURT

KATSINA STATE HIGH COURT

KEBBI STATE HIGH COURT

KOGI STATE HIGH COURT

KWARA STATE HIGH COURT

LAGOS STATE HIGH COURT

NASARAWA STATE HIGH COURT

NIGER STATE HIGH COURT

OGUN STATE HIGH COURT

ONDO STATE HIGH COURT OR HERE

OSUN STATE HIGH COURT

OYO STATE HIGH COURT

RIVERS STATE HIGH COURT OR HERE

PLATEAU STATE HIGH COURT

SOKOTO STATE HIGH COURT

TARABA STATE HIGH COURT

YOBE STATE HIGH COURT

ZAMFARA STATE HIGH COURT



INTERNATIONAL TRIBUNALS

ECOWAS COURT

AFRICAN COURT

WORLD COURT (ICJ)

INTL' CRIMINAL COURT

WTO (TRADE) TRIBUNAL

ITLOS (MARITIME)

CAS (SPORTS)

WIPO (ARBITRATION & MEDIATION)

ICSID [WORLD BANK]




NIGERIAN JUDICATURE

Nigeria is Federal Republic comprising a federal government, 36 State governments, a federally government governed Federal Capital Territory and 774 Local Government Areas. Its judiciary is thus designed to cover those different levels of government and their territories: federal, state and local government.


The Nigerian Judicature is made up of the regulatory institutions, courts/tribunals, judicial processes,
judges and non-judge workers, the inter-phasing agency of law enforcement centers and Prisons or other holding centers. Together they all uphold the idea of effective justice administration for the benefit of citizens and other stakeholders connected to the Nigerian sovereignty which is the primary justification for a judicial arm of government.


FEDERAL COURTS

Generally, Federal Courts exercise authorities over objects and subjects which fall within the powers and authorities of the Federal government as set out in the Constitution while State Courts exercise jurisdiction over matters that fall within those of the State.


Two Courts, the Supreme Court and the Court of Appeal are courts of the federation in the sense that they service both State and Federal objects, operating for the large part to maintain the stability of the Federation as a whole and each of its component units separately. Importantly, they provide a central clearing house for judicial appeals emanating from State or federal courts.


Core federal courts include the Federal High Court, National Industrial Court, Code of Conduct Tribunal, Investment and Securities Tribunal and Professional Disciplinary Tribunals (domiciled within professional bodies established to regulate various professionals), Election Tribunals and of course, Courts of the Federal Capital Territory, FCT, Abuja- the seat of government.


Apart from the Courts of the FCT, other federal tribunals are mostly federal in object, not in location. In other words, depending on administrative and operational convenience, they generally maintain administrative and/or adjudicatory centers in designated states of Nigeria unlike their State counterparts which are located within the boundaries of their individual States.


COURTS OF THE FEDERATING UNITS [STATES/FCT]

The three arms of government legislature, executive and judiciary - are generally reflected across the 36 States and the Federal capital as well as the 3 levels recognised by the Constitution - Federal, State, Local Government - with varying degrees of independence.  Instructively, when it comes to the judiciary, the Constitution:

1.     gives only the first two levels federal and state power to establish judicial bodies or tribunals. Local governments in Nigeria have no authority to establish courts or tribunals; and

2.     provides a unified appellate system for all the federating units of the Nigerian federation under the umbrella of a single Court of Appeal and the Supreme Court as the final appellate authority .

 

Courts constitutionally within the establishment powers of every State government and the Federal Capital Territory include:

i.       State High Courts;

ii.       Magistrate Courts;

iii.      Customary/Area/Native/Sharia Courts;

iv.      Customary Court of Appeal;

v.       Sharia Court of Appeal; and

iv.     Specialized tribunals set up by States for various purposes like rent, traffic, land disputes etc.

The jurisdiction of each of the courts/tribunals established for a State or Federal Capital Territory are defined by the establishment law made by the State House of Assembly or in the case of the Federal Capital Territory, by the National Assembly. Aside from the State/FCT High Court, every federating unit in Nigeria has the prerogative to decide when and if to establish other types of tribunals through the passage of the relevant law.



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